Faster, further, higher - Aviation exemplifies Man's desire to fly and soar above the Earth…

The best engineers, scientists, designers and pilots have combined over the years to produce cutting edge machines that were designed for the crucial purpose of a country's defense. Drawing on the absolute best in materials and resources, a series of iconic planes have emerged over the years that serve as a benchmark to look upon in man's progress in the sky.

Our collection of timepieces seeks to honor both the aircraft and the untold story of the airmen who have dedicated themselves both in and out of the cockpit to bring these incredible machines to life.

The Hurricane, produced by Hawker Aircraft Ltd for the Royal Air Force was a single seater fighter aircraft that featured in the air battles of World War 2.

Sometimes overshadowed by the Spitfire, it was nonetheless the Hawker Hurricane which could truly claim to be the most acclaimed, most successful, most reliable aircraft to deliver Allied Victory in the air during WW2.

The unsung hero of the Battle of Britain – that most crucial of air victories for the Allies, the Hawker Hurricane delivered more enemy kills than any other aircraft combined.


The Hawker Hunter was a single seater jet propelled fighter developed by Hawker Aircraft in the 1950s.

With the close of World War 2, the Hawker Aviation team developed an aircraft to meet the needs of the Royal Air Force and their allies.

Entering service in July 1954, Hunter F.1 was the first high-speed jet aircraft equipped with radar and fully powered flight controls. A prototype of the Hunter, flown by Neville Duke – broke the airspeed record in September 1953.To date the Hunter remains an iconic benchmark of the Jet age in aircraft fighter technology.


The Hawker Harrier and the Hawker Harrier II are commonly known as being Harrier Jump Jets.

Their unique Vertical and Short Take Off and Landing engine design made them extremely useful and were designed to be operated in advanced theatres of conflict where air bases or runways would not be accessible.

Armed with the latest in technology – the Harrier is continually being updated with the latest in weaponry, guidance systems and avionics. The Harrier has proven and continues to prove its worth as a modern, sophisticated jet aircraft.


The Avro Lancaster is a British four-engined Second World War heavy bomber designed and built by Avro for the Royal Air Force (RAF) The "Lanc", as it was affectionately known, became the most famous and most successful of the Second World War night bombers, "delivering 608,612 long tons of bombs in 156,000 sorties.

The Lancaster is a mid-wing cantilever monoplane with an oval all-metal fuselage. The wing was constructed in five main sections, the fuselage in five sections. All wing and fuselage sections were built separately and fitted with all the required equipment before final assembly. The tail unit had twin elliptical fins and rudders.


The colloquial term flyboy was and is often used to describe a pilot belonging to the air force.

Ever since the turn of military aviation in WWI – the term has stuck as a casual reference to describe young men, who if they were boys on the ground were definitely not boys in the air. Their heroism, swagger and bravado – especially in the hair-raising days of open cockpit combat have been immortalized in modern history.

This irrepressible group with their undeniable charisma and sense of duty – inspire this range of casual timepieces. The military colors and influence in shape give credence and strength to this line of watches designed with panache and flair.

The Seafire found use during operation "Torch", the Allied invasion of North Africa in 1942. It continued to provide the Fleet with air cover right through the war. As the defeat of Germany grew nearer it was realised that the Aircraft-Carrier dominated war in the Pacific was soon to be the prime theatre of war, so 1944-45 saw a flurry of Seafire development, and the needs of the Navy overshadowed those of the Royal Air Force. The Supermarine Seafire was the naval version of the Supermarine Spitfire adapted for operation from aircraft carriers.